Linear Fluorescent

Updated
09-VII-2017
The Linear Fluorescent category represents the original and most basic form of fluorescent lamp. While the long, slender proportions of this light source makes them ideal for many applications, it can be a hindrance in others. Some two decades after their commercialisation and the refinement of the basic range, efforts were diverted into reducing the size of the light source. This resulted first in the range of Non-Linear Fluorescent Lamps, and later during the 1980s the extention to still more advanced Compact Fluorescent Lamps.

All of the lamps features on this page belong to the original Linear category, and despite the advantages of the more modern versions, the original linear fluorescent lamp still accounts for a greater quantity of artificial light produced on this planet than any other light source. Owing to its high efficacy and supremely low cost, this lamp type will most likely be one of the last to be seriously challenged by LED technology.

Silicate Lamps

GE-Mazda

14W

Early silicate lamp of American design
1945

Westinghouse

20W

Early silicate lamp of American design
c.1945

BTH-Mazda

80W

Early silicate lamp of British design
1945

Halophosphate Lamps

BTH-Mazda

80W

Early halophosphate lamp of British design
1949

Philips

80W

MCFE 80w/33 with Bayonet Caps
1969

Osram-GEC

80W

Last Production with Bayonet Caps
1990

Sylvania

15W

American halophosphor with bakelite caps
1950
       

Halophosphate Deluxe Lamps

Osram-GEC

80W

Deluxe Warm White with Bayonet Caps
1956
       

Lamps with Ignition Aids

Mazda

20W

MCFA Linear Fluorescent with Instant Start Stripe
1962
       

Reflector Lamps

Philips

8W

TL Mini Aperture with clear stripe along lamp
2000
       

Coloured Lamps

GE-Mazda

15W

Early Red with cadmium borate phosphor + dye
c. 1941

GE-Mazda

15W

Early Blue with calcium tungstate phosphor
c. 1941
   

Ultra-Violet Lamps

GE-Mazda

4W

Miniature Blue-UV Lamp with Oval Glass Tube
1941

Philips

20W

TL 20W/08 Blacklight Blue
1969