Updated 06-II-2016

Carolina Welds

Introduction
The Carolina Welds Plant of the General Electric Company of America did not produce complete lamps, but was a component factory that supplied materials to other final-assembly lamp, electronic tube and cathode ray tube plants. Its main products were welded wire assemblies, in which a number of different metal wires are welded together end-to-end. These are employed as the electrical feedthroughs in lamps of all kinds. The special 2-core 'Dumet' wire, whose thermal expansion coefficient matches that of soft glasses and which is employed as the vacuum-tight glass-to-metal seal in lamps, was also manufactured at Carolina. The site was opened in 1946 with 25 employees, as a sister factory for the earlier-established Jefferson Welds Plant to provide additional capacity. However Carolina quickly outstripped its predecessor and rapidly grew to become the largest manufacturer of lead wires in the world, supplying not only GE's American plants with leadwires, but also a large number of competitors around the world who relied on GE for the supply of these specialised components. Following GE's takeover of the Hungarian Tungsram company in 1990, much of the component manufaturing was transferred to those considerably lower cost East-European facilties. In October 2010 GE announced its intention to close the facility, and precisely one year later production was ceased with the loss of the final 46 jobs.


GE Carolina Products Plant, 2010.

Address 900 North George Street, Goldsboro, North Carolina 27530, U.S.A.
Location 35.3938°N, -77.9956°E
Opened 1949.
Closed 2011.
Products Welded Leadwire Assemblies.


References
1 A Century of Light, James A. Cox, published by The Benjamin Company / Rutgers, 1979, ISBN 0-87502-062-3, pp.144-147.
2 GE Plant Closing by Steve Herring, Goldsboro News Argus, October 28th 2010.